Archive for the ‘Frida Kahlo’ Category

Frida Kahlo What the Water Gave Me

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo What the Water Gave Me

What the Water Gave Me was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1938. This painting is sometimes referred to as “What I Saw in the Water”. Unlike most of Frida’s paintings, this one has no dominant central focus. It is a symbolic work illustrating various events from the artist’s life and incorporates numerous elements from her other works as well as some that appeared in her later works. The style of this painting is “surrealistic” although Frida never considered herself a “Surrealist” and didn’t even know about surrealism at the time it was painted.  oil painting reproductions sale

What the water gave her were images of past and present, life and death, comfort and lost. In the midst of this vision is Frida, drowned in her imaginings and bleeding from the corner of her mouth. She is kept afloat by a lasso that serves as a tightrope for insects and a miniature dancer. buy famous reproduction paintings online

Frida rarely talked about her paintings but in a conversation with Julien Levy she described this painting as: “It is an image of passing time…about time and childhood games in the bathtub and the sadness of what had happened to her in the course of her life”. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 91 cm, Width: 70.5 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo The Two Fridas

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo The Two Fridas

The Two Fridas was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1939. Shortly after her divorce from Diego Rivera, Frida completed this self-portrait of two different personalities. In her diary, Frida writes that this painting originated from her memory of an imaginary childhood friend. Later she admitted it records the emotions surrounding her separation and martial crisis. On the right, the part of her person which was respected and loved by Diego, is the Mexican Frida in Tehuana costume. oil painting reproductions sale

In her hand she holds an amulet bearing the portrait of Diego as a child. On the left, a more rather European Frida in a lacy white Victorian wedding dress, the Frida that Diego abandoned. The hearts of the two women lie exposed, a device Frida often used to express her pain. The unloved Frida’s heart is broken while the other Frida’s heart is whole. From the amulet that Frida is holding springs a vein that travels through both women’s hearts and is finally cut off by the surgical pincers held in the lap of the rejected Frida. In despair, Frida tries to stop the flow of blood from Diego but it keeps dripping…she is in danger of bleeding to death. The stormy sky filled with agitated clouds may reflect Frida’s inner turmoil. Holding her own hand, she is her only companion. buy famous reproduction paintings online

In 1947, this painting was purchased by the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes (National Institute of Fine Arts) in Mexico City. The purchase price was 4,000 Pesos (about $1,000) for the painting and an additional 36 Pesos for the frame. That was the most Frida was ever paid for a painting during her lifetime. A reproduction of this painting is on display in the Frida Kahlo Museum in Coyoacán, Mexico. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 173.5 cm, Width: 173 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo Two Nudes in the Forest

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo Two Nudes in the Forest

Two Nudes in the Forest (The Earth Itself) was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1939. Frida’s ambivalent sexuality may serve as the motif for this painting. She had several lesbian friends and made no attempt to conceal her bisexuality, even from her husband Diego. The light-skinned woman rests her head on the lap of the darker-skinned nude while from the undergrowth, the women are being watched by a monkey; traditional symbol of sin, the devil and animal sexuality. Or, perhaps the painting may not be sexual at all but instead the two women are aspects of Frida’s duality; the European and the Mexican Indian, the comforter and the comforted. oil painting reproductions sale

The same two nude figures in this painting also appeared in an earlier painting “What the Water Gave Me”. The painting was a gift for her intimate friend, Mexican film star Dolores del Rio. This painting was originally titled: “The Earth Itself”. It is unclear to me if either one of the women in this painting is Frida. Neither have Frida’s signature uni-brow. buy famous reproduction paintings online

In 1989, this painting was auctioned by Sotheby’s with an estimated selling bid of $120,000 – $160,000. It sold for $506,000 to Mary Anne Martin, the owner of a New York Art Gallery that specialized in Latin American Art. The pop star “Madonna”, who at the time was buying and collecting Kahlo art, was the underbidder. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 25 cm, Width: 30.5 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo My Nurse and I

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo My Nurse and I

My Nurse and I was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1937. Frida’s mother was unable to breastfeed her because her sister Cristina was born just eleven months after her. She had to be fed by a native Indian wet-nurse whom the family hired for that sole purpose but was later fired for drinking on the job. The relationship between them appears distant and cold, reduced to the practical process of feeding. Because it was the adult Frida who had the memory, the baby has an adult head, and because she could not remember her wet nurse’s facial features, she covered her face with a pre-Columbian funerary mask. Frida wrote about this painting saying: “I am in my nurse’s arms, with the face of a grownup woman and the body of a little girl, while milk falls from her nipples as if from the heavens.” buy famous reproduction paintings online

The wet nurse does not embrace nor cuddle Frida… she displays her like a sacrificial offering. The unfurled blank scroll along the lower edge of the painting suggests that Frida thought of it as an “ex-voto” but never inscribed the scroll. In this painting, Frida transformed the “Madonna and Child” mothering image into an expression of loss and separation from her own mother with whom she never really bonded. oil painting reproductions sale

Frida considered this to be one of her most powerful works and is another painting in her series to document major events in her life. A pre-Columbian idol from Diego’s personal collection may have been the model for this painting. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 30.5 cm, Width: 37 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo Sun and Life

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo Sun and Life

Sun and Life was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1947. As a result of a terrible bus accident at age 18, Frida was unable to have children. Her obsession with fertility was often the subject of her paintings.  buy famous reproduction paintings online

In this painting, the life-giving sun is surrounded by plants in the form of erupting male penises and female wombs protecting a growing fetus. The painting also reveals Frida’s sadness over her infertility as shown by the weeping sun and fetus. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 40 cm, Width: 50 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo Self Portrait with Loose Hair

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo Self Portrait with Loose Hair

Self Portrait with Loose Hair was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1947. In 1946, Frida again traveled to New York for a spinal fusion. This operation has been called “the beginning of the end” for Frida. Although she consulted numerous, perhaps too numerous, doctors, her condition grew steadily worse after this operation. This self-portrait was painted while she was recovering from the operation. In it, Frida looks thin and frail yet relaxed and almost smiling. The text on the scroll at the bottom reads:

“Here I painted myself, Frida Kahlo, with my reflection in the mirror. I am 37 years old and this is July, 1947. In Coyoacan, Mexico, the place where I was born”.

In this inscription she claims to be “…37 years old…” when in fact she was really 40 at the time this self-portrait was painted. buy famous reproduction paintings online

In this self-portrait Frida has greatly exaggerated her hair… perhaps to please Diego who loved her long flowing hair. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 61 cm, Width: 45 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo Tree of Hope Remain Strong

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo Tree of Hope Remain Strong

Tree of Hope, Remain Strong was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1946. Frida painted this self-portrait for her patron, the engineer Eduardo Morillo Safa, after a botched operation in New York. She wrote to him about the painting and about the scars “…which those surgeon sons of bitches landed me with”. In the message “Tree of Hope, Remain Strong”, which is written on her flag, she seems to be giving herself courage. The phrase is taken from one of her favorite songs, “Cielito Lindo”. oil painting reproductions sale

In this painting we see two Fridas; the one on the left is the Frida who has just been rolled out of the operating room on a hospital trolley and the other is the forceful, upright and confident figure of Frida. The painting is divided into two halves, one day and one night. The maimed and bleeding body is assigned to the sun, which in Aztec mythology the sun is fed by sacrificial human blood. The two gaping wounds in her back are echoed in the fissures in the barren landscape behind. The other Frida, looking strong and optimistic, is assigned to the moon, a symbol of womanhood. buy famous reproduction paintings online

In her hand she holds the corset that she has “Hope” of casting off forever after the surgery. Unfortunately, this surgery was terribly botched and resulted in numerous complications. It has been described as “the beginning of the end” for Frida. In April of 1977, this painting was auctioned at Sotheby’s. The auction estimate was $20,000 – $30,000 with a minimum sale price of $20,000. The painting failed to reach the minimum sale price but was sold anyway to the highest bidder for $19,000. This painting can be reproduced on canvas byDaydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 55.9 cm, Width: 40.6 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo The Wounded Deer

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo The Wounded Deer

The Wounded Deer was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1946. In this painting of a young stag fatally wounded by arrows, Frida expresses the disappointment which followed the operation on her spine in New York in 1946, and which she had optimistically hoped would cure her of her back pain. Back in Mexico, however, she continued to suffer both physical pain and deep depression. In this painting, Frida presents herself with the body of a young stag and her own head crowned with antlers. buy famous reproduction paintings online

Pierced by arrows and bleeding, the deer stares out at the viewer from a forest enclosure. Although the stormy, lightning-lit sky in the distance is a brightening hope for escape, the deer will never reach it. One meaning of the word “Carma”, which appears in the painting’s lower-left corner, is “destiny” or “fate”. In this painting, as in most of Frida’s self-portraits, she presents herself as incapable of changing her own destiny. Frida used her own pet deer “Granizo” as a model for this painting. The deer in the painting is surrounded by trees and trapped, transmitting a feeling of fear and desperation, with no way to escape from the situation. oil painting reproductions sale

The true meaning of this painting is open to many interpretations. Some say this painting portrays Frida’s inability to change her own destiny, or, Frida’s frustration over the failed surgery, or, a surreal painting of Frida enraged in the battle of the sexes. On May 3, 1946, Frida gave this painting to her friends Lina and Arcady Boitler as a wedding gift. With it she included a note that said: “I leave you my portrait so that you will have my presence all the days and nights that I am away from you”. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 22.4 cm, Width: 30 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo Without Hope

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo Without Hope

Without Hope was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1945. A lack of appetite resulting from her many surgeries and numerous illnesses, left Frida very thin. Her doctor, Dr Eloesser, prescribed complete bed rest and a fattening diet of pureed food every two hours. In this painting, the artist portrays what she considered to be a “forced feeding” diet.  famous paintings reproductions online

The wooden structure that once held her canvases for painting now holds a funnel that continuously feeds her. Not even the sugar skull on top of the heap makes the entree look appetizing. Her arms seem to be pinned beneath the blankets and she is unable to control the situation…. The situation seems to be “Without Hope”.  This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 28 cm, Width: 36 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

Frida Kahlo Moses

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Frida Kahlo Moses

Moses was painted by Frida Kahlo in 1945. This painting is sometimes referred to as “Nucleus of Creation”. In a written description of this painting, Frida refers to it as “Moses”, or “Birth of the Hero”. This masterpiece was commissioned by Don José Domingo Lavin. Kahlo had painted a portrait of Lavin’s wife in 1942. oil painting reproductions sale

Lavin asked Frida to read the Sigmund Freud book “Moses the Man and Monotheistic Religion” and then paint her interpretation of what she had read. This painting was done in the style of a miniature mural…perhaps to copy the works of her famous husband, muralist Diego Rivera. The central figure of the abandoned baby Moses closely resembles Diego, and wears, like Diego in other paintings, the third eye of wisdom on his forehead. buy famous reproduction paintings online

The birth is beneath a life giving sun flanked by gods, heroes, common humanity, and the all-embracing hands of death. In the foreground a conch spurting fluid into a concave shell is, Frida said, a symbol of love. Fresh, leafy branches sprouting from dead tree trunks refer to the life/death cycle that appears in many of Frida’s paintings. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 61 cm, Width: 75.6 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.