Posts Tagged ‘buy john william waterhouse paintings’

John William Waterhouse The Enchanted Garden

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse The Enchanted Garden

The Enchanted Garden was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1916. This was one of Waterhouse’s final paintings. He left it unfinished at his death. ‘He created this haven of warmth in the winter of his life, but almost unwittingly imbued it with a deeper meaning. Past the Dantesque guardian at the entrance, the snow is falling on the steps: it gathers on the entablature above the rounded Renaissance arches which evoke the Italy of his birth, and a few flakes are seen against the shadows of the arcade. buy famous reproduction paintings online

But in the garden the roses bloom; one of the girls bends to inhale their scent, and the poppies presage a quiet oblivion. Roses and snow together sum up the duality of desire and restraint in all his work, and because poetry was ever-present in his life, he must also have had Tennyson’s Arthur in mind, and ‘the island-valley of Avilion, where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow. Nor ever wind blows loudly’. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 112 cm, Width: 161 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse Sweet Summer

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse Sweet Summer

Sweet Summer was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1912. This painting was auctioned for £265,500 at Sothebys (London) in June 1998. The following text is taken from their catalogue:

‘This lovely painting of a girl lying on a lawn beside a pool is of the loosely classical but essentially subjectless type that John William Waterhouse, along with other Romantic artists of his generation, turned to in the early years of the present century. The ancient world is suggested to the spectator by the fountain – which consists of lion heads from the mouth of each of which a jet of water flows – and the marble pavement and column bases of a temple, seen at the top edge of the composition. buy famous reproduction paintings online

Sweet Summer represents the ongoing Aesthetic tradition, pioneered by artists such as Edward Burne-Jones and Albert Moore in the 1860s. The senses are used to evoke the mood of the model.
She is shown holding in her right hand a rose, the scent of which seems to pervade the scene; likewise the plash of water from the fountain fills the air with its gentle sound. Cast down on the grass is a fan, which indicates the warmth and oppressive stillness of a summer’s day. In fact the heat is such that the girl has partially removed her dress, exposing her left arm and her breasts, and thus lending a sensuous character to the image. oil painting reproductions sale

All of these elements of sight, sound and smell seem to contribute to a feeling of distraction and restlessness on the part of the girl, and as her gaze is far away and she is quite unconscious of the spectator, one must assume that the artist has sought to describe the emotions of unfulfilled love. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 38.1 cm, Width: 83.8 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse Spring Spreads One Green Lap of Flowers

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse Spring Spreads One Green Lap of Flowers

Spring Spreads One Green Lap of Flowers was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1910. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 105.9 cm, Width: 76.9 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse Listening to My Sweet Pipings

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse Listening to My Sweet Pipings

Listening to My Sweet Pipings was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1911. The following text comes from an auction catalogue: “This picture was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1911 and was bought by Major Alec P. Henderson, the second son of Alexander Henderson, Lord Faringdon, whose family were Waterhouse’s chief patrons during the later part of his career. buy famous reproduction paintings online

As so often with the artist’s work at this date, the picture belongs to a series in which he explored different aspects of a theme, in this case that of spring. The series extended over several years, going back to the early 1900s, including the Boreas of 1904, and reaching a climax in two pictures shown at the Royal Academy in 1913, A Song of Springtime and Narcissus, both of which joined this picture in Alex Henderson’s collection. oil painting reproductions sale

Listening to my Sweet Pipings is not entirely characteristic of the series in that the main figure is reclining, but cousins of the putto playing the pan-pipes appear in A Song of Springtime, the only two occasions on which the motif occurs in these paintings.” This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 58.4 cm, Width: 104.1 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse Windflowers

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse Windflowers

Windflowers was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1903. Waterhouse painted a series of paintings showing girls in windswept landscapes. Other examples are the recently rediscovered Boreas, and the currently unlocated March Winds. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 116.5 cm, Width: 79 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus

Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1900. Traditionally, Orpheus was the son of a Muse (probably Calliope, the patron of epic poetry) and Oeagrus, a king of Thrace (other versions give Apollo). According to some legends, Apollo gave Orpheus his first lyre. Orpheus’ singing and playing were so beautiful that animals and even trees and rocks moved about him in dance. buy famous reproduction paintings online

Orpheus joined the expedition of the Argonauts, saving them from the music of the Sirens by playing his own, more powerful music. On his return, he married Eurydice, who was soon killed by a snakebite. Overcome with grief, Orpheus ventured himself to the land of the dead to attempt to bring Eurydice back to life. With his singing and playing he charmed the ferryman Charon and the dog Cerberus, guardians of the River Styx. His music and grief so moved Hades, king of the underworld, that Orpheus was allowed to take Eurydice with him back to the world of life and light. Hades set one condition, however: upon leaving the land of death, both Orpheus and Eurydice were forbidden to look back. The couple climbed up toward the opening into the land of the living, and Orpheus, seeing the Sun again, turned back to share his delight with Eurydice. In that moment, she disappeared. oil painting reproductions sale

Orpheus himself was later killed by the women of Thrace. The motive and manner of his death vary in different accounts, but the earliest known, that of Aeschylus, says that they were Maenads urged by Dionysus to tear him to pieces in a Bacchic orgy because he preferred the worship of the rival god Apollo. His head, still singing, with his lyre, floated to Lesbos, where an oracle of Orpheus was established. The head prophesied until the oracle became more famous than that of Apollo at Delphi, at which time Apollo himself bade the Orphic oracle stop. The dismembered limbs of Orpheus were gathered up and buried by the Muses. His lyre they had placed in the heavens as a constellation. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com.  Original Dimensions: Height: 149 cm, Width: 99 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse The Awakening of Adonis

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse The Awakening of Adonis

The Awakening of Adonis was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1900. In Greek mythology, Adonis was a youth of remarkable beauty, the favourite of the goddess Aphrodite. Traditionally, he was the product of the incestuous love Smyrna (Myrrha) entertained for her own father, the Syrian king Theias. Charmed by his beauty, Aphrodite put the newborn infant Adonis in a box and handed him over to the care of Persephone, the queen of the underworld, who afterward refused to give him up.  buy famous reproduction paintings online

An appeal was made to Zeus, the king of the gods, who decided that Adonis should spend a third of the year with Persephone and a third with Aphrodite, the remaining third being at his own disposal. Adonis became an enthusiastic hunter, and was killed by a wild boar during the chase. Aphrodite pleaded for his life with Zeus, who allowed Adonis to spend half of each year with her and half in the underworld. oil painting reproductions sale

The central idea of the myth is that of the death and resurrection of Adonis, which represent the decay of nature every winter and its revival in spring. He is thus viewed by modern scholars as having originated as an ancient spirit of vegetation. Annual festivals called Adonia were held at Byblos and elsewhere to commemorate Adonis for the purpose of promoting the growth of vegetation and the falling of rain. The name Adonis is believed to be of Phoenician origin (from ‘adon, “lord”), Adonis himself being identified with the Babylonian god Tammuz. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 95.9 cm, Width: 188 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse Lamia

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse Lamia

Lamia was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1909. In classical mythology, Lamia was a female daemon who devoured children. According to late myths she was a queen of Libya who was beloved by Zeus. When Hera robbed her of her children from this union, Lamia killed every child she could get into her power. She was also known as a fiend who, in the form of a beautiful woman, seduced young men in order to devour them. oil painting reproductions sale

It was this latter incarnation of Lamia as a beautiful woman that inspired John Keats to write his poem Lamia, published in 1820. Waterhouse bases his portrayal of Lamia upon Keats’ poem. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 91.4 cm, Width: 57 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may

Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1909. Celebrating the splendour of youth and the joys of spring, this important rediscovery was made by Odon Wagner.  buy famous reproduction paintings online

The work has never been exhibited in public and was reproduced only once during the artist’s lifetime. The painting is signed and dated 1909 and has been established as the first picture in the Symbolist ‘Persephone’ series that engrossed Waterhouse from 1909 to 1914. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 100 cm, Width: 83 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.

John William Waterhouse A Mermaid

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

John William Waterhouse A Mermaid

A Mermaid was painted by John William Waterhouse in 1900. A mermaid (masculine Merman) was a fabled marine creature with the head and upper body of a human being and the tail of a fish. Similar divine or semidivine beings appear in ancient mythologies (e.g., the Chaldean sea god Ea, or Oannes). In European folklore, mermaids (sometimes called sirens) and mermen were natural beings who, like fairies, had magical and prophetic powers. They loved music and often sang. Though very long-lived, they were mortal and had no souls. buy famous reproduction paintings online

Many folktales record marriages between mermaids (who might assume human form) and men. In most, the man steals the mermaid’s cap or belt, her comb or mirror. While the objects are hidden she lives with him; if she finds them she returns at once to the sea. In some variants the marriage lasts while certain agreed-upon conditions are fulfilled, and it ends when the conditions are broken. oil painting reproductions sale

Though sometimes kindly, mermaids and mermen were usually dangerous to man. Their gifts brought misfortune, and, if offended, the beings caused floods or other disasters. To see one on a voyage was an omen of shipwreck. They sometimes lured mortals to death by drowning, as did the Lorelei of the Rhine, or enticed young people to live with them underwater, as did the mermaid whose image is carved on a bench in the church of Zennor, Cornwall, Eng. This painting can be reproduced on canvas by Daydaypaint.com. Original Dimensions: Height: 98 cm, Width: 67 cm. Other sizes and custom sizes are available, Please Contact with us by email: daydaypaint@gmail.com.